Welcome - Expert Physiotherapy Advice and Health Information for Australian Fishermen.

Overuse Injuries in Fly Fishing

To many people, fishing is a leisure activity associated with a peaceful connection with nature.
For others it is a profession that has the same hazard of Repetitive Strain Injuries (RSI) as other Professions that overuse certain muscle groups.

It might be unbelievable that such a relaxing Action can be related to pain in the shoulder, elbow and wrist. But recent research has shown that certain styles and processes of cast are associated with more pain. In this article, we will review this research, help you choose which cast method is best for you, and discuss how.
When you think of sports injuries I bet you never consider injuries sustained while fishing? To many folks, fishing is a leisure activity associated with a peaceful link with nature. Most people visualize calm waters, sunlight and good times when they think of fishing, not harms. It might be amazing that such a relaxing action can be related to pain in the shoulder, elbow and wrist. Aside from the apparent injuries, (hook to finger, hook to eye (ouch!), or fish bites), finger and hand fractures, carpal tunnel syndrome, elbow injury and rotator cuff problems are very common amongst anglers.

The Best Way to Get a Big Fish and Not Injure Yourself

When you think of sports injuries I wager you never consider injuries sustained while fishing, right? To many folks, fishing is a leisure activity related to a peaceful link with nature. Most folks envision quiet waters, sunshine and great times when they think of fishing, not harms. It might be amazing that such a relaxing action can be related to pain in the shoulder, elbow and wrist. Besides the apparent harms, (hook to finger, hook to eye (ouch!), or fish stings), finger and hand fractures, carpal tunnel syndrome, elbow harm and rotator cuff problems are quite common amongst anglers.

Reinforcing the muscles in your shoulder is a great method to assist in preventing shoulder injuries while fishing. These exercises should be done in training to fish, not after pain has grown. Begin with a light weight and do 20-30 repetitions of each exercise, slowly increasing weight as the exercise becomes too simple.

Lie in your belly on a table or a bed. Keep your elbow bent, and slowly lift your left hand. Lower the hand slowly. Duplicate 20-20 times.

Lie in your right side with a rolled up towel under your right armpit. Extend your right arm above your head. Roll your left shoulder out, lifting the left forearm until it's level with you shoulder. Lower your arm slowly. Duplicate 20-30 times.

Lie in your right side. Flex your right elbow to 90 degrees. Now roll your right shoulder in, lifting your right forearm up to your torso. Lower the forearm. Duplicate 20-30 times.

In a standing posture, begin with your right arm midway between the front and side of your body, thumb down (you may have to lift your left arm for equilibrium). Lift your right arm until nearly amount (about a 45 degree angle). Don't lift beyond the stage of pain. Slowly lower your arm. Duplicate 20-30 times.

FREE Physiotherapy for Fishermen in Australia

Working at sea is among the most difficult jobs in the Australia, and the time spent abroad means it could be a difficulty receiving treatment for work-connected harms. In 2011 the Gladstone Sport Fishing Research Fund established an innovative scheme to encourage physiotherapy to fishermen, working with Australian Physiotherapy Association providers in some regions and financing private treatment in others. The scheme has been reviewed and from October 15th 2015 all working fishermen living in the Australia will be eligible for free physiotherapy supplied by Connect Physiotherapy and financed by the SHS.

SHS is working with the Fishermen’s Mission to publicise the scheme in fishing communities throughout the Australia. Commodore Rn Fickens, Chief Executive of the Assignment, said: “we're pleased to learn the scheme was expanded and will do everything we can to support the initiative.

Peter Coulson, SHS General Secretary, described: “We examined a range of strategies as a pilot only over 4 years past. We financed private physiotherapy for fishermen in Kilkeel and Newlyn, and worked with NHS suppliers in Brixham and Peterhead & Ayrshire to encourage high-speed access to NHS services. At the exact same time we started a scheme for retailer evaluations offering national use of private physiotherapy guidance and treatment, that has been financed by SHS and supplied by Connect.

We understand there's a requirement for physiotherapy amongst fishermen and consider the time is currently appropriate to expand the scheme. So, in the start of October we will be financing free physiotherapy for working fishermen living everywhere in great britain. We’ve created new leaflets and posters targeting all Australia fishermen and will be spreading them extensively.”

The physiotherapy service will be run by Connect Physiotherapy for the Seafarers Hospital Society. It’s accessible at times to suit individual requirements and in any place. All fishermen must do is call 0191 247 5000 and order to speak into a chartered physiotherapist that will counsel on how better to handle their state, supply proper exercises and order for any needed treatment to be supplied locally.

Ben Watling, Head of Corporate at Connect, said: “It's significant that musculoskeletal issues are identified, understood and handled efficiently. Quick access to physiotherapy can have an important impact on the speed of healing and avoid long term or repeated difficulties. Our phone advice line ‘PhysioLine’ supports early intervention and our Australia wide network of physiotherapists are there to supply any needed treatment for seafarers. We're pleased with the success of the pilot with retailer seafarers and welcome the chance to to supply similar services to fishermen who may be suffering from aches, pains, strains and injuries, changing their work, lifestyle, wellbeing and perhaps support”.

In Newlyn, the SHS will be keeping the services supplied by Harbourside Physiotherapy practice that has been financed to provide physiotherapy to local fishermen since 2007. This can be an incredibly powerful local service that'll remain accessible, so fishermen in Newlyn will nevertheless be supported by Harbourside but may use the Connect service if they want.

Physiotherapy Guide For Fishermen

Physiotherapy features prominently in the first ever health guide for fishermen, established today as part of Seafarers Awareness Week.

Physiotherapist Claire Stevenson, left, who treats fishermen at her harbourside practice in Newlyn, Cornwall

The Fisherman miniature guide urges that working fishermen seek early physiotherapy for back injuries and supplies practical health advice, top hints and simple-to-follow exercises.

Physiotherapist Claire Stevenson worked on the new guide and contains extensive experience of treating fishermen at her harbourside practice in Newlyn, Cornwall.

‘The guide was created to support fishermen to look after themselves, put their health first, look after their backs and ensure they can be appropriate to visit sea,’ said Ms Stevenson.

Free resource

The best thing is it is free to all fishermen and my team will be delivering it to every skipper, to keep on their boats, as well as to those that come to our practice.’

It was prompted by growing recognition of the stressful and physically demanding nature of commercial fishing, which frequently needs fishermen work long hours in high risk states.

The health pamphlet continues to be jointly made by two charities - the Seamen’s Hospital Society (SHS) and the Men’s Health Forum.

Physiotherapy Fitness for Fly Fishing

Many individuals consider fishing as a sedentary pastime, yet a day spent climbing hills, wading through deep water, the continuous movement of casting and retrieving, as well as the attempt of landing creature fish can all accumulate to a serious work out. We’re going to demonstrate the best way to get the body in shape for an excellent day out fishing.

For additional information about what to do for particular harms, simply see our Painbuster & Guidance sections at South Cronulla PhysioCentre

Flexibility

Spending long periods sitting down in your daily life will stiffen up your shoulder, neck and upper back. Because these joints need to go easily and fluidly with fly fishing (particularly with Spey cast) not only do you want to find your skill hampered if you're tight here, it’s simple to get a pull or injury. If your upper back is tight, you may experience stretching your arm and writhing, which can limit your shoulder motion causing strain in your joints.

Warming up– It’s significant to get the blood circulating before your head outside. Five to ten minutes of jogging on the spot, or a brisk walk to your locating is enough to do that. This helps blood to circulate to all the muscles you might be going to use when you start to cast, bringing precious nutrients and heat to the joints and muscles you might be going to use. Should you be still for any period of time you are going to stiffen up again so be sure to loosen up again with some exercise.

Being typically flexible will allow you to get the most from your fishing experience, so loosen up your neck and back before you head out by following some of the next guidance and stretches:

Get them fixed before you go. The persistent strains the human body survives are substantial, particularly when you've got preceding shoulder, arm, neck or back injuries and pain. A deep tissue massage will loosen out the knots in muscle tissue to get that added flexibility needed for a strong cast. And should you sense aches and pains after, pop in to your own .

Physio Helps Take The Pain From Fishing

A physiotherapist’s decision to enhance the well-being of local fishermen could result in a major programme being put in place to support this ‘unheeded’ community nationally.

Claire Stevenson’s work has so helped the fishing community in Newlyn, Cornwall, that it should be repeated at other ports, says the charity that financed her to run a pilot project.

Nick Addlington, of the Seamen’s Hospital Society, said physiotherapy designed to treat preventing harms had, crucially, helped to ‘alter the behavior of fishermen within their work at sea’. He told Frontline: ‘We want to widen the programme. Ultimately we should supply fishermen UK-extensive with an improved support for his or her musculoskeletal wellness.’

Ms Stevenson said: ‘Fishermen have started to manage their own issues and are actually recognizing they do’t need to put up with pain.’

The CSP has been quite curious to find out about Ms Stevenson’s work, and needs to use her and the Seamen’s Hospital Society to further investigate the problems raised by the pilot project.

‘We need to define the knowledge, abilities and expertise needed by physiotherapists to work with fishermen with a view to rolling out more powerful physiotherapy care to fishing communities across great britain,’ said Ruth ten Hove, the professional advisor who heads the Society’s work on self referral.

Ms ten Hove is fantastic to hear about any services which are offering exceptional use of groups of patients who cannot obtain care during the ‘regular’ 8.30am-4.30pm hours